Archive for the ‘Indie’ Category

Maybe it’s because spring is around the corner, bringing its sense of new beginnings. Or maybe it’s a renewed sense of zen after taking a step back from reality for a little while. Whatever the case, I’ve decided it’s high time to just let things go. Grudges don’t help anyone out, don’t do anyone any favours. They really only affect you, occupying your every thought, impacting your every emotion. So if someone’s throwing shade your way, let it slide. Move on. Cut your losses. Because this can be a lot harder than it seems, here are a few tracks to help you rid yourself of all that drama.

“Shine” by Mondo Cozmo

This song from Philly-bred, LA-based artist Josh Ostrander, is about figuring out the right path to take, and finding one’s way through it. The music is hopeful and more than anything, it reminds us there’s nothing wrong with asking for a little help.

“Landslide” by Fleetwood Mac

A track from 1975, that remains relevant to this day. The sadness in Stevie Knicks’ voice, and the lyrics full of reflection, can’t help but make us think that no matter what happens to us, life moves forward. Sometimes, you just have to leave the past behind, be the bigger person, and focus on the future; as hard as it may be.

“Don’t Look Back in Anger” by Oasis

Wise words from these Britpop royals.

“Walk Away” by Ben Harper

Ben Harper has this magical way of using his voice, music and lyrics to convey the deepest of emotions, completely effortlessly. The track says it all.

 

“Let it Go” by James Bay

Typically, I don’t lean towards overplayed Top 40 pop music, but there’s just something about this one. Bay masterfully controls his voice, making you feel everything he does. The lyrics, though simplistic at times, are also real which helps the listener relate to Bay’s woes.

 

British trio The xx formed back in 2005, and first came onto the scene in 2009 with their debut album, xx. Romy Madley Croft provides vocals and guitar; Oliver Sim, vocals and bass; Jamie Smith, beats and production. They followed up with 2012’s sublime, Coexist, and most recently 2016’s work of art, I See You. Here’s why you need them in your life.

The Sound: It’s subtle, nuanced, echoing each and every feeling they express, without being distracting. It perfectly sets up the mood for each track, knowing when to quiet down, and when to pick things up. It’s so meticulously and purposefully placed in each track, such that each note, each strum, each pluck of a string, each inflection, each beat has a specific place in the song; nothing is superfluous. It doesn’t fit in any particular genre, having flecks of indie rock and dance; hints of pop and electronic; plenty of confessional tones. The beats, guitar and bass shimmer so brightly together, the resulting music comes off in such a way that, no other version of the song will ever make sense. Their sound is incomparable, inimitable, and frankly deserves to be a genre all on its own.

The Lyrics: One thing to note about The xx, you can’t just have them on in the background. You have to listen to them, and you’ll thank me because what you’ll hear will take you to a place you’ve never been before. You’ll find yourself deep in thought, ruminating over some life event in ways you never have. Each word, each phrase, is so well thought out. Every syllable is in there for a reason, and has a role to play in unfolding the inner workings of Croft and Sim’s minds. They know exactly what to say, and how to say it, and only say what’s necessary to convey their mood; nothing more, nothing less. Like true poets.

The Vocals. There’s nothing outwardly spectacular about their vocals; they don’t do runs, they’re not power houses, they don’t show anything off. They exude just the right amount of force when singing, perfectly exercising control, and not getting carried away. They can be haunting, moving, playful, emotional, thoughtful, on the verge of tears, confident, confused, and everything else you can imagine. They’re honest and vulnerable, and sometimes a total mess on the inside – and it all translates perfectly through their delivery.

The Albums. When you combine their sound, their lyrics and their vocals, this is what you get: a masterpiece that grabs your soul and breaks it apart piece by piece, leaving you empty and broken inside. Then out of nowhere, breathes life right back into you, reviving your soul and making you feel things far beyond what you ever thought possible. I’m not being hyperbolic, they’re just that good. It’s not just a one-off either. Each of their albums is unique in its own way, but still manages to evoke the same senses. If you’ve never seen them live, please do – it’s an experience you’ll  never forget.

 

I tend to go through a lot of phases with music. I get fixated on a certain genre/style, and spend months absorbing as much as I can. I hunt for more music that makes me feel that same feeling, because I can’t get enough. I experienced this phenomenon when I first came across these 2 lovely gentlemen.

Benjamin Francis Leftwich

A young bloke from the UK who gently fell on the scene in 2010 with his debut 4-track EP, A Million Miles Out. The Pictures EP soon followed in early 2011, and his debut studio album Last Smoke Before the Snowstorm later in 2011. There’s something about the simplicity of a guy and his acoustic guitar. It’s real, it’s vulnerable, and it makes everyone around swoon. With tracks like “Atlas Hands” and “Pictures,” Leftwich’s music really gets under your skin, in the most soothing way possible. His 2016 release, After the Rain feels like an extension of Last Smoke, as evidenced on “Tilikum” (which can be a good or bad thing, depending on how you look at it.) What is certain though, is it’s near impossible to resist Leftwich’s pull on your heart strings.

 

Benjamin Howard (aka Ben Howard)

Yet another young bloke from the UK, this Benjamin prefers to go by simply, Ben. Howard’s sound is sweet, stripped-down, with hues of folk. His first album, 2011’s Every Kingdom professed his feelings of love, to an optimistic tune. Tracks like “Keep Your Head Up” are musical and upbeat, whereas ones like “Gracious” are a little more subtle and reflective. In 2014, he released his sophomore album I Forget Where We Were. This release still showcased his distinct vocals, but the overall feel of is much more melancholic. He seems defeated on most tracks, and the tone is definitely darker, like on “Small Things.” Howard is a young, versatile artist who sticks to his roots, but has the ability to experiment with different sounds and tones, all the while creating great music.