Archive for the ‘80s Music’ Category

February is the dead of winter. No spring in sight, holidays left far behind, and all that remains is freezing cold temperatures, snowstorms, slushy sidewalks, wind chills, and gray skies. Your time is better spent avoiding the outdoors, and hanging out with these tunes.

“Winter Solstice” by Cold Specks

The ethereal music and her flawless vocals are truly gorgeous; the lyrics, however, take a darker turn. Just like winter: pretty on the outside, cold and miserable on the inside.

“The New Great Depression” by The Moth & The Flame

Pretty sure they’re talking about February here. (Note: this video deserves a medal.)

“Favourite Colour is Blue” by Robert DeLong feat. K. Flay

The haunting music, the raspy vocals, and the overall loudness and anger of the track, all perfectly mirror how I feel about winter.

“A Case of You” by Joni Mitchell

Spending all this time indoors, allows me to discover/catch up on new music. The way this 70s classic digs deep and pulls everything out from your insides is truly remarkable.

“Barefoot in the Park” by James Blake feat. Rosalia

Blake’s sublime music and vocals, coupled with Rosalia’s Spanish verses, transport the listener to better times, warmer temperatures, and the freedom of being barefoot.

“Shiver” by Coldplay

These days, I prefer to think of the other kind of shivering: the nervous-exciting-goosebumpy-I’m so into you-type of shivers, that Coldplay so eloquently puts into song.

“Home” by morgxn feat. Walk the Moon

The one thing I most look forward to during February is going home, putting on my pjs, burying myself under heavy blankets, and drinking tea. It’s the only time I feel warm.

“7 Rings” by Ariana Grande

It’s fun. She’s fun. The whole album is fun. And who couldn’t use a little fun during these arctic temperatures?

“Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen

This track’s chaotic/unique/genius arrangement is exactly how my mind feels after being cooped up indoors for days on end.

“Long December” by Counting Crows

Winter’s always too long, and every year I hope it won’t be.

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In this part of the Live Series, I take a look at the concerts that got away. Those shows that somehow eluded me, and now I’ll always be left in the world of what could’ve, should’ve, and would’ve been.

Michael Jackson

This is obvious. I always assumed I would see him, but alas.

Oasis

There is something so comforting about these guys. I have many memories attached to their music, and their classic sound is filled with nostalgia, making them feel like lifelong friends. The familiarity in their music never fails to warm me up inside. Yet, between 1994 and 2008, they played 12 live shows in Toronto, and I couldn’t find the time in my busy, self-absorbed life, to go see them live. They broke up in 2009, and I will never forgive myself for missing out on something that should’ve happened.

Coldplay

I’ll start right away with admitting that I have seen Coldplay live. Once in either 2006 or 2008 for either the X&Y or Viva La Vida tour; once accidentally in 2011 at Lollapalooza. Here’s the thing: everything Coldplay did post- X&Y isn’t worth listening to. That’s when they sold out, changed their sound to appeal to the masses, and lost what truly made them unique, truly made them Coldplay. I didn’t really fall for them until their sophomore album A Rush of Blood to the Head, released August 2002. In September 2002, they breezed through Toronto, and I was offered a free ticket. I could’ve seen them at their peak, but like an idiot, I declined. By October 2002, I was obsessed with them, and I haven’t stopped kicking myself since.

Nirvana

Also, an obvious one. They played such a huge role in my musical upbringing, my childhood/adolescence, my pre-teen angst. Since their career was short-lived due to Kurt Cobain’s untimely death, I always wonder how amazing it would’ve been to witness them live. They only came to Toronto 3 times between 1990 and 1993; the Nevermind tour happened at the Opera House. Can you even imagine how historic that would’ve been?

Queen

Queen played a total of 7 live shows in Toronto from 1977-1982, making it impossible for me to have ever attended. But man, it would’ve been a dream. Their music alone would be reason enough to go, but with Freddie Mercury on the mic, his showmanship on display, and the band’s music live, all amongst a giant crowd: that would’ve been music at its best.

In continuation of this live series, here’s a look at some performers that just fell short of utter perfection.

Chris Cornell

I first saw Chris Cornell in Hamilton in 2008, playing a show in support of his solo album, Carry On. I drove all the way from Whitby, and braved a heavy snow storm to get there. I went with a potential more-than-friend friend, to the Hamilton Convention Centre – a venue that has more of a high school gym feel, standing room only, but big enough that you didn’t have to rub sweaty elbows with anyone. I soon found out, the best thing about a Chris Cornell show is that you not only get his solo music, but also that of Soundgarden, Audioslave and Temple of the Dog. How can you beat that?

I also saw him play as part of Soundgarden’s reunion tour at Molson Amphitheatre, back in 2014. Although the company was great, and the music full of nostalgia, the far-away lawn seats made it difficult to fully get engaged in the show, and I left wanting more. Not to mention, the dramatic rainstorm put a damper on the experience.

My all-time fave show of his by far, was an acoustic solo show (ie just him and his guitar) at Massey Hall, which I attended solo. He interacted so much with the crowd, told stories, performed his heart out – including his epic version of “Billie Jean” and his version of “One” – a mash up of Metallica’s “One” lyrics and U2’s “One” music. His voice is was as much of an instrument as his guitar; so soulful, emotive and unique. It’s an effin’ shame we don’t get to experience him anymore. RIP.

Ben Harper

Ben Harper is a man of many talents. He plays multiple instruments, including a lap slide guitar; his music can be soft and poetic, but also angry and rock ‘n roll. He performs as a solo act, and also with different bands/musicians.

The first time I saw him was back in 2009 alongside The Relentless 7 at the Virgin Festival, at the Molson Amphitheatre. Although I appreciated the obvious talent and musicianship, I left underwhelmed. His sound with The Relentless 7 is a lot more funk-based and instrumental jamming, which is great; just not my preferred version of what I know Harper can do.

I got the opportunity to see him again in 2011, for a solo show at Sound Academy (now, Rebel; previously, the Docks,) on the Give ‘Til It’s Gone tour. I had balcony seats so it wasn’t as crowded as the general admission area, and he was phenomenal. He went on for 7 encores. Yes, 7. And probably could’ve kept on going. He’s such a force on stage, namely his powerful lyrics and sublime vocals. I left elated, and only wanting more and more.

By far, the best performance of his I saw was – similar to Chris Cornell – a solo acoustic show at Massey Hall, which I, once again, attended solo, back in 2012. It was just him and a line up of at least 10 different guitars, all of which he played with sheer perfection. He was very interactive with the audience, even serenading a couple seated in the front row with “Forever” when they told him they just got engaged. During the show. His music is easily in my top 5 favourites, and he’s such a dream to watch; it feels like he’s talking/singing directly to you, getting you through whatever you’re going through, and being a friend with whom you share all your thoughts. He’s also incredibly easy on the eyes. Swoon.

U2

I tallied it up, and I’ve seen U2 a total of 6 times live: 1997 Popmart tour, SkyDome; 2001 Elevation tour, Air Canada Centre; 2005 Vertigo tour, ACC; 2009 360 tour, SkyDome; 2015 Innocence + Experience tour, ACC; 2017 Joshua Tree tour, SkyDome. I’ve always attended with someone, either family or friends.

For the longest time, I was the most obsessive unapologetic U2 fan. Everything they did turned to gold, in my eyes. The first time I saw them, I was blown away. The sheer production of their show was like nothing I’d ever seen. Lights, lasers, lemon-shaped disco balls, you name it. And the caliber of the performance matched it perfectly, including Bono’s voice, which doesn’t age even in the slightest as he gets older. Not to mention, hearing/seeing “Sunday Bloody Sunday” live is a rite of passage for any music/U2 fan.

The 2015 show ended it for me though. None of their music after 2004 was any good, and got worse and worse with every album. This show was more about production, special effects and fancy stages. It was all so distracting from the performance itself, which seemed to hide behind all the grandiosity, and suffered as a result.

I got suckered into seeing their Joshua Tree tour – to witness the classics one last time – but that was the end of it for me. I can’t justify it anymore. Neither their live shows nor their music are anything like what they used to be, so I’ll give them a shout out for entertaining me for so many years.

The National

I was first introduced to The National back in the early 2000s. It was love at first listen. Since then, I’ve seen them perform a whopping 8 times: 2008 Boxer tour, Brooklyn Academy of Music; 2008 New Yorker Anniversary, Hammerstein Ballroom; 2009 High Violet tour, Kool Haus; 2010 High Violet tour, Massey Hall; 2011 High Violet tour, ACC; 2013 Trouble Will Find Me tour, NXNE Yonge-Dundas Square; 2014 Trouble Will Find Me tour, Massey Hall; 2017 Sleep Well Beast tour, Sony Centre. Either solo, with friends, or family. I’ll be honest though, mostly solo.

They put on an incredible show. Goosebumps for days. They outperform even themselves almost every time, and every track is that much better than the album version. I’ve even met lead singer Matt Berninger at the screening of their documentary, Mistaken for Strangers. Suffice it to say, I’m a fan. And to be honest, the quality of their music hasn’t wavered since that first album of theirs I heard. But the truth is, after seeing them so many times, their live show has become somewhat predictable.

The quasi a capella version of “Vanderlye Crybaby Geeks,” the amped-up punk-rock ‘n roll version of “Mr. November,” the adventurous nature of Berninger walking and singing through the crowd. I can understand as a first-time viewer, how incredible it is to see, so I totally get why they keep doing it.

A better and frankly more likely explanation is, I’ve become a concert snob. I need variety, perfection, emotion, and satisfaction. Don’t get me wrong, at the most recent show I saw of theirs, I was thoroughly entertained. But it just wasn’t enough. I want it to feel like I’m watching them for the first time again, and I don’t know if it will ever be that way again.